2012 Events Calendar

_mg_9099_650x433.jpg

CNY HUMANITIES CORRIDOR: 2012 EVENTS CALENDAR

 

Fall


December 7, 2012: Philosophy (PHI3) UNYWEMP: “Force Forschung” (a two-day workshop on the concept of force in early modern thought) (Organizers: Andrew Chignell, Kara Richardson), Cornell University
This will be a workshop on December 7-8 at Cornell under the UNYWEMP rubric (and advertised on our website).  We now have a silly tradition of using alliteration in naming these events (Cartesian Colloquium, Berkeley Bonanza, etc.), and so this one will be called “Force Forschung.” The goal is to have five outside speakers come and give talks related to the concept of force in physics, psychology, metaphysics, and politics in 17th-18th century philosophy. Local Corridor scholars (faculty and/or grad students) will serve as commentators.  The keynote speaker is Karen Detlefson, from University of Pennsylvania.

November 20, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH18) “Improvisation in Theory and Practice” (Organizers: Annette Richards/Roger Moseley, CU), Cornell University 
Concert, masterclass, and discussion by Edoardo Bellotti, specialist in early Italian keyboard music at the Eastman School of Music; also featuring David Yearsley, Cornell.

November 12, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH12), Syracuse University 
The New Chamber Music Initiative, Phase II, will consist of concerts of contemporary music by contemporary music groups at the top of the field; readings and performances of works by student composers; opportunities for students to perform alongside professionals in concert; and colloquia and informances (informal lecture-recitals) on the varied cultural lives of the countries represented, and the place and future of contemporary music in each. To facilitate this last concern the series will feature two groups from the U.S. and two from abroad. Ensemble Nordlys, of Denmark, will perform a program of new works, several of which were composed for the ensemble, and late-20th-century masterworks by Polish composer Witold Lutoslawski.

The Danish Ensemble Nordlys is a quartet consisting of violin, cello, piano and clarinet, the classical piano trio and one of Mozart’s favourite instruments. Various combinations of these four instruments allow presenting a wide variety of exciting repertoire. Ensemble Nordlys performs music from the Baroque era, Viennese and romantic periods, and music of our time. The quartet has given world premieres of more than 60 compositions dedicated to the ensemble.

November 10, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH18) “Improvisation in Theory and Practice” (Organizers: Annette Richards/ Roger Moseley), Cornell University
Lecture and discussion by Emily Thompson: a follow-up event to the performance by Dennis James on Oct 31, and one of three events that focus on relationships between musical improvisation and film from silent cinema to the present. 

Benjamin_Memoryscapes_and_Imageworlds_Logo.jpg

Nov 3-4, 2012: Linguistics (LIN6) “The Second Cornell Workshop in Linguistics and Philosophy: Communicative acts” (Organizers: Sarah Murray/ William Starr), Cornell University 
This interdisciplinary workshop will bring together philosophers, psychologists and linguists to examine the nature of human communication. This will range from considering detailed theories of narrative in film, depiction in visual art, and linguistic expressions of personal taste (e.g., ‘tasty’) to considering general theories of how communication happens. The workshop will feature presentations of previously circulated papers, comments and discussion.

November 1, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC3) Early Modern Thinking – session 6, Cornell University
Paper/workshop session; presenter: Bruno Bosteels (CU), topic: Badiou’s Spinoza.

November 2012: Philosophy (PHI6) “Paul Patton Lecture, reception and graduate seminar” (Organizers: Tim Murray), Cornell University
Lecture, reception, graduate student seminar and working dinner with a leading figure in continental philosophy. Paul Patton, University of New South Wales, or an alternate guest.

October 31, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH18) “Improvisation in Theory and Practice” (Organizers: Annette Richards/Roger Moseley), Cornell University
Screening of silent film at Cornell Cinema, accompanied live by renowned organist Dennis James. One of three events that focus on relationships between musical improvisation and film from silent cinema to the present

October 30, 2012: Digital Humanities (DH8) “Digital Humanities Lecture: Cathy Davidson” (Organizer: Tim Murray), Cornell University
Lecture for Digital Humanities Project; Dr. Cathy Davidson, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Ruth F. Devarney Professor of English, Duke University

October 19, 2012: Linguistics (LIN7) “Workshop on Suspended Affixation” (Organizers: John Whitman/Jaklin Kornfilt), Cornell University
The topic of so-called Suspended Affixation (SA) in Linguistics reside at the interface of morphology and syntax. The term refers to a phenomenon, found in many languages, but in particular in syntactically head-final and morphologically agglutinative languages, whereby in a coordination of words, some right-peripheral inflectional morphology shows up on the second conjunct only, but has scope over the first conjunct, as well; thus, that morphology is, in some sense, “suspended”. 

Suspended Affixation appears to violate a principle often referred to in the literature as Lexical Integrity, a principle that prohibits application of syntactic processes to parts of words. SA phenomena have thus attracted the attention of syntacticians interested in morphology and morphologists aware of syntactic issues. The proposed workshop, to be held at Cornell University, October 19-20 2012, is designed to address these topical questions, by bringing together a number of researchers who have addressed such questions in their recent work. The workshop will consist of talks by invited speakers.

Invited speakers: Prof. Judith Aissen, Emerita, UC Santa Cruz; Prof. Jonathan Bobaljik, UConn; Prof. Aaron Broadwell, SUNY Albany, Linguistics; Prof. Jorge Hankamer, UCSC, Linguistics; Prof. Ralf Noyer, UPenn, Linguistics; Prof. Takumi Tagawa, University of Tsukuba, Japanese Linguistics and Prof. Draga Zec, Cornell, Linguistics.

October 11, 2012: Musicology/ Music History  (MMH18)  “Improvisation in Theory and Practice” (Organizers: Annette Richards/ Roger Moseley), Cornell University 
Performance and discussion featuring Michael Ashkin, Annie Lewandowski, and Tim Feeney, centered on screening of Ashkin’s short films to improvised soundtracks by Lewandowski and Feeney. One of three events that focus on relationships between musical improvisation and film from silent cinema to the present.

_mg_9021_650x433.jpg

October 2, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH18) “Improvisation in Theory and Practice” (Organizers: Annette Richards/ Roger Moseley), Cornell University 
Performance and masterclass on jazz improvisation pedagogy, featuring faculty and student musicians from Cornell, Syracuse University, and the Eastman School of Music.

October 1, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC3) Early Modern Thinking – session 5Syracuse University 
Paper session; presenter: John Rogers (Yale University), topic: TBD 

October 1, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC7) “The Black and Blue Danube” Symposium (Organizer: Marijeta Bozovic, Colgate), Colgate University 
The first planned event of the new working group is a symposium to be held at Colgate University in October 2012, with the theme “The Black and Blue Danube.” The Danube River, like much of the region it traverses, has attracted surprisingly little scholarly attention, and what exists too often privileges single disciplinary or national perspectives. We instead see the river as both boundary and border, fluidly connecting multiple nations, and cultural and economic spaces, through legal and illegal flow. It intersects civilizations and nature, physical and imaginary spaces and invites an array of critical approaches. As both a real geographic feature and a guiding metaphor, the Danube River brings together the scholarship of Central New York faculty across fields and disciplinary divisions. We hope that this collaboration and the lasting exchanges it will cultivate can serve as a promising model for genuine, creative, and inspiring interdisciplinary academic work.

September 7-8, 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC17) “Global Biennials Workshop” (Organizer: Tim Murray), Cornell University 
Gathering of working group participants with guests from Duke University for two-day workshop. Workshop will include full day meetings on Friday and Saturday, with lunches on Friday and Saturday and a dinner meeting on Friday.

Participants: Cornell: Tim Murray, Jolene Rickard, María Fernández, Salah Hassan, Renate Ferro; Syracuse: Gregg Lambert; Rochester: (TBA); Duke University: Ian Baucom, Kristine Stiles, Rick Powell, Ranjana Khanna, Pedro Lasch.

Invited guests from the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China, Professor Pan Gonqkai and University of Beijing, Professor Peng Feng. 

September 1, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC3) Early Modern Thinking – session 4, Syracuse University
Paper session; presenter: Crystal Bartolovich (SU), topic: “the Common.”

Fall & Spring 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3) “SU Visiting Artist Series,” Syracuse University and University of Rochester 
Support travel of Rochester faculty and grads to select visiting artist presentations at SU (each Tuesday of the semester),  as well as receptions.

Fall, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH12) "The New Chamber Music Initiative, Phase II, Duo Diorama," Syracuse University 
The New Chamber Music Initiative, Phase II, will consist of concerts of contemporary music by contemporary music groups at the top of the field; readings and performances of works by student composers; opportunities for students to perform alongside professionals in concert; and colloquia and informances (informal lecture-recitals) on the varied cultural lives of the countries represented, and the place and future of contemporary music in each. To facilitate this last concern the series will feature two groups from the U.S. and two from abroad. Canadian/Chinese ensemble Duo Diorama will perform new works for violin and piano, and explore the varying roles of new music in Western and Chinese cultures.

Duo Diorama comprises Chinese violinist MingHuan Xu and Canadian pianist Winston Choi. They are compelling and versatile artists who perform in an eclectic mix of musical styles, ranging from the great standard works to the avant-garde. It is a partnership with a startlingly fresh and powerful approach to music for violin and piano. Comprised of two renowned soloists who can effectively blend their distinctive personalities together to create a unified whole, the duo maintains an active performing and touring schedule.

Fall 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures  (VAC3) "Exhibition/Talk of SU Grad Student Art at Cornell, with Rochester critics responding to exhibition," Syracuse University and University of Rochester
Bring selection of AIDS posters to Syracuse for exhibition at XL projects.  Reception; talks by UofR faculty and grads.

Fall 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3) “Visual Immigration Speaker/Screening," Syracuse University and University of Rochester
Speaker and screenings connected to Cornell and to Syracuse University’s La Casita Center.

Fall 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3) “Jack Lewis talk and screening," Syracuse University and University of Rochester 
Screening of documentary from South African filmmaker Jack Lewis (potentially in conjunction with SU exhibition of AIDS poster show).
 

 

Summer


July 1, 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3), Syracuse University and University of Rochester 
A four day intensive workshop for faculty and graduate students to be held at SU’s Minnowbrook facility.

May 31, 2012 - June 4, 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3), Syracuse University and University of Rochester
Support travel of (SU) and (UR) faculty to attend the Visual Culture Now conference and present activities of the corridor in a spotlight panel.

(Planning: Summer-Fall 2012 - Events: Spring 2013) Musicology/ Music History (MMH19) “Focus on Britten and Lutoslawski,” Cornell University
Planning sessions to organize symposia and associated performances scheduled for spring 2013: The Britten-Lutoslawski Year (Benjamin Britten, 1913-1976; Witold Lutoslawski, 1913-1994). Planned events will take place on all three campuses, January-May 2013, with Cornell as the prime location.

 

Spring


May 11, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH20) “Music, Cognition and Technology,” Syracuse University
Cornell Faculty: Roger Moseley, Carol Krumhansl, Kevin Ernste, Eliot Bates; Cornell Grads: Musicology: Caroline Waight, Evan Cortens Composition: Taylan Cihan, Eric Nathan; Science/Tech Studies: Owen Marshall, Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo; East Asian Studies: Tyran Grillo; Psychology: Kat Agres; Rochester Faculty/Grads: Elizabeth Marvin (TBA), David Temperley (TBA), David Headlam (TBA), graduate students working in composition and music cognition.

May 1, 2012: Archives and Media (AM2), Syracuse University 
The goal of this project is to highlight the primary source collections held by special collections libraries within the humanities corridor. Four grants of $2,500 each will be awarded to scholars whose projects merit support and which draw upon collections at one or more corridor institution. Recipients need not be based at a corridor institution. A call for applications will be circulated in February 2012. Awardees will be identified by April 2012.

April 28, 2012: Philosophy (PHI4), Cortland University
This event recreates the very successful Mellon Metaphysics Workshop held in May 2009.  Four faculty members from Syracuse, Rochester, and Cornell will present papers.  The event will be attended by faculty and grad students at all three institutions (as well as two visiting philosophers who will be in town anyway to give departmental colloquia the preceding Friday, one at the invitation of Cornell, and one at the invitation of Syracuse).

April 26, 2012: Linguistics (LIN8), Syracuse University
Workshop about the most recent methods in analyzing sociolinguistic variation and change. The purpose of this workshop is to educate and inform linguists as well as researchers in other related disciplines such as anthropology and discourse analysis, about new techniques, methods, and softwares that are used, for example, to do phonetic analysis or statistical analysis on linguistic variation in general.

April 20, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC1), Syracuse University
Workshop: A half-day event with lunch and mid afternoon coffee; paper presentations by 3-4 workshop participants.

Possible participants: S. Wadley, C. Gordon, C. LaDousa, R. Habib, T. Bhatia, I. Pandey, J. Harasta, P. Worden, B. Urciuoli; M. Kamiya, N. Ries, M. Haddix, A. Lutz, L. McGrath, K. March

April 5, 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC17), Cornell University
Lecture, reception and working dinner on international artists featured at Global Biennials.

April 1, 2012: Philosophy (PHI3), Syracuse University 
Workshop paper on Berkeley by Melissa Frankel. Commentator TBA.

April 1, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC3) Early Modern Thinking – session 3, Syracuse University 
Paper session; presenter: Rayna Kalas (Cornell), topic: “Constitutions.”

March 20, 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3), Syracuse University and University of Rochester
Support travel of Rochester faculty and students to performance of play RED at Syracuse Stage and support for guest speaker Sumi Hayashi, curator of Kawamura Memorial Museum of Art lecture about Rothko’s reception in Japan.

DigitalWitness2012.jpg

March 7, 2011: Musicology/ Music History (MMH12), Syracuse University 
The New Chamber Music Initiative, Phase II, will consist of concerts of contemporary music by contemporary music groups at the top of the field; readings and performances of works by student composers; opportunities for students to perform alongside professionals in concert; and colloquia and informances (informal lecture-recitals) on the varied cultural lives of the countries represented, and the place and future of contemporary music in each. To facilitate this last concern the series will feature two groups from the U.S. and two from abroad. The California EAR Unit will replace Open End in the lineup, and will perform at both Syracuse and at Hamilton College.

March 4, 2012: Philosophy (PHI3), Syracuse University 
Workshop paper on Berkeley by Richard Brook. Commentator TBA. Dinner for 10-15 participants.

March 1, 2012 Digital Humanities (DH8)"Lecture for Digital Humanities Project": Lecture for Digital Humanities Project, Cornell University 
Dr. Kevin D. Franklin, Executive Director, Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts and Social Science Senior Research Scientist, National Center for Supercomputing Applications University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

March 1, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC3) Early Modern Thinking – session 2, Syracuse University
Library workshop with paper session; presenter: Bill Sherman (York University, UK) on marginalia (to coincide with presentation of highlights from the History of Science collection).

February 24, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC1), Syracuse University
Initial planning session for Language, Power and Identity – a Friday lunch meeting scheduled for February; introductions and planning for half-day workshop in April; approximately 12 attendees.

February 3, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH21) "Gender and Performativity," Syracuse University
Planning Meeting (Location: SU), this planning meeting will be the first of seven meetings on the theme “Gender and Performativity” planned for Spring and Fall 2012 by a sub-group of eight professors: Carol Babiracki, Art & Music Histories, SU; Theo Cateforis, Art & Music Histories, SU; Kwame Dixon, African American Studies, SU; Ellen Koskoff, Musicology, Eastman, UR; Ralph Locke, Musicology, Eastman, UR; Mary Simonson, Film & Media Studies, Colgate; Amanda Winkler, Art & Music Histories, SU.

Throughout 2012, we intend to conduct a series of six half-day mini-seminars (three per semester) with invited scholars who are working in the interdisciplinary intersections of performance studies and gender.  We are interested in both broadening our theoretical perspectives on the topic and focusing those perspectives on our own research projects in music theory and analysis, jazz, human rights, theatre, popular music, film studies, and dance studies.  Each mini-seminar will center around readings selected by the seminar leader.  The series of mini-seminars will culminate in a day-long, public symposium in November 2012 featuring a keynote speaker and members of the “Gender and Performativity” sub-group.  We hope to publish the symposium papers along with contributions from the seminar leaders in an edited volume by the end of 2013.

February 1, 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH18), Cornell University 
Improvisation in Theory and Practice This project sets out to explore critical, theoretical, and practical approaches to improvisation across historical and geographical boundaries and in multiple genres and contexts. By bringing together scholars and musicians from Cornell University, the Eastman School of Music, and Syracuse University with expertise in diverse improvisatory traditions, we hope to foster dialogue and collaboration within and between the three institutions. Beyond that, we aim to develop new discursive and disciplinary frameworks that will enable nuanced discussion and debate on the complex relationships between improvisatory traditions and the cultural conditions that sustain(ed) them.


To this end, we have planned a series of four workshops over the course of the spring semester 2012, each of which will focus on a particular body of writing and music. The workshops will facilitate critical and theoretical exchanges on issues that have a bearing on improvisation across diverse musical genres: these might include such concepts as spontaneity, uncertainty, indeterminacy, memory, cognition, creativity, intelligibility, communication, agency, and freedom. Our discussions will be informed and inspired by one or more improvised events that reflect the workshop's themes.

February 1, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC3) Early Modern Thinking – session 1, Syracuse University 
Library workshop with paper session; presenter: Allan Megill (UVA) on Historicism and Ranke (to coincide with exhibit of early treasures in special collections).

January- July 2012: Philosophy (PHI6), Cornell University 
Gathering of working group participants for the purpose of articulating working group goals, and Fall 2012 activities. The planning will include one afternoon meeting, followed by a dinner meeting. For the meeting, we will invite a leading figure in continental philosophy to discuss goals and options for future projects. 


Participants: Andrew Chignell, Timothy Murray, Bruno Bosteels, Timothy Campbell, Naoki Sakai, Kevin Attell, Karen Pinkus, Neil Saccamano, Anette Schwarz; Syracuse University: Gregg Lambert; Le Moyne College: Eugene Brent Young.

January 29, 2012: Philosophy (PHI3), Syracuse University 
Workshop paper on Descartes by Georges Dicker. Comments by Marie Jayasekera (Colgate).

January 26, 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3), Syracuse University and University of Rochester
Support speaker series centered around Shimon Attie’s Humanities Seminar; receptions; travel for Rochester students/faculty.

January 18, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC2) "Translational Studies," University of Rochester 
Planning Phase for Lectures, Roundtables, and Working Groups on Translation and Culture for 2013. Including meetings among corridor members and one consultancy meeting.

January 18, 2012: Literature, Languages, and Culture (LLC4), University of Rochester 
Planning Phase for Lectures, Roundtables, and Working Groups on Transnational American Studies for 2013. Including meetings among corridor members and one consultancy meeting.

January 1, 2012 – December 31, 2012: Corridor Travel (TRAV2) “Corridor travel support,” Cornell
(Organizer: Tim Murray)
Support for corridor travel of Cornell participants in 2012.

Spring 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3), Syracuse University and University of Rochester
Support speaker series around Revisualizing AIDS exhibition at Rochester.

Spring 2012: Linguistics (LIN4), Syracuse University
Central NY Linguistics Graduate Student Workshop.  Second workshop for graduate students in Linguistics. This workshop offers the opportunity for graduate students at all three Central New York universities to present their work. The workshop will consist of a sequence of 30-minute presentations, each followed by a discussion period. We expect contributions in the core areas of linguistic theory — Syntax, semantics, morphology and phonology — as well as from students working in computational linguistics, experimental psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and applied linguistics.

Participants: 

  • William Labov (Professor of Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania). He is known as the father of Sociolinguistics. He is the most influential figure in the field. His methods of analyzing sociolinguistic variation and change are adopted throughout the world.
  • Sali Tagliamonte (Professor of Linguistics at the University of Toronto). She is known as one of the best in the field regarding analytical methods of sociolinguistic variation and change.
  • Rania Habib (Assistant Professor of Linguistics and Arabic at Syracuse University). She has worked on language variation and change among migrant speakers to urban centers. Currently, she is working on the spread of urban features from urban centers to rural areas due to various linguistic and social factors.

Spring 2012: Visual Arts and Cultures (VAC3) "Revisualizing AIDS," Syracuse University and University of Rochester
Series of speakers and events focused on UR’s exhibition of AIDS posters.

Spring 2012 and Fall 2012: Musicology/ Music History (MMH17): Teaching Exchange, Cornell University 
All three institutions in the Mellon Corridor have distinguished faculties in musicology, but since no single faculty body can cover all the areas that now figure within the fields of musicology, ethnomusicology, and music theory, this funding will permit guest teachers from one of the institutions to lead a class or graduate seminar at one of the others.  The faculty at each institution will decide among themselves which course(s) of their own would benefit the most from a visitor and extend the invitation to the faculty member in question.  Each institution will make the necessary arrangements at the start of the spring and fall semesters; it is not possible to plan for the entire year now because the course offerings for the fall have not yet been fully determined.