2014 Events Calendar

CNY HUMANITIES CORRIDOR: 2014 EVENTS CALENDAR

 

Fall


December 6  7,  2014: Central New York Humanities Corridor Workshop in Theoretical and Experimental Linguistics (LIN4) Syracuse University

Workshop on the interfaces between syntax and semantics, and between syntax and phonology, structured the workshop to reflect cutting-edge research in both theoretical and experimental linguistics, with further focus on including senior faculty, junior faculty, and graduate students as presenters. 

November 17, 2014: CNYX Experimental Film Festival (VAC3) Syracuse University
Breaking the Frame with Marielle Nitoslawska and Carolee Schneemann.

Marielle Nitoslawska, born in Canada, is a filmmaker, cinematographer and film professor who lives and works in Montreal. She received her B.F.A. in Studio Arts and Art History from Concordia University, Montreal and an M.F.A., magna cum laude in Cinematography from the Polish National Film School in Lodz. She remained in Poland for a decade, working as a filmmaker during the social and cultural upheavals that led to the fall of that country’s communist government. There, she shot numerous exploratory ethnographic films in 35mm and actively participated in the underground media arts movement in Lodz, with friends and mentors from the Workshop of Film Form. Nitoslawska has made numerous film essays, both feature length and short form on ground-breaking movements and artists such as Domingo Cisneros, Szczepan Mucha, Jozef Robakowski, and Carolee Schneemann. Poetic and unconventional, her films explore the ideas behind the work of these artists and their contemporary significance. Her films have received critical acclaim and extensive festival play, and include Bad Girl (2002), a groundbreaking documentary investigating explicit representations of female sexuality; Sky Bones (1999, nominated for Best Art Doc, Hot Docs); and Choices: An Artist From Eastern Europe Speaks Out (1987), included in the National Gallery of Canada’s permanent collection.  

A pioneer of performance and body art as well as avant-garde cinema, multi-disciplinary artist Carolee Schneemann has been breaking the frames of the art world for five decades. Using her own body as a medium, Schneemann’s most well-known pieces Meat Joy (1964), the film Fuses (1967), Interior Scroll (1975, performed live at Telluride in 1977), and Up to and Including Her Limits (1973-1976), shattered the taboos against the representation of sexuality and the female body. Yet while these pieces scandalized the male-dominated art world, they also irrevocably transformed the history of art. Since the 1970s, Schneemann’s iconic oeuvre has influenced innumerable artists and continues to enjoy international critical acclaim. She remains an active artist today, with an impressive list of international exhibitions. In recognition of her pioneering achievements, Schneemann has received numerous awards and honors. She is a USA Fellow for Visual Arts, Rockefeller Foundation (2011); recipient of a President’s Award, Bard College (2012) and of the Ono Lennon Courage Awards for 2012.

November 8  November 9, 2014: Fourth Cornell Workshop in Linguistics and Philosophy (LIN6) Plurality Cornell University

This interdisciplinary workshop will examine the ways humans express and conceptualize pluralities. There are many kinds of plural expressions in language, including ‘the children’, ‘no aliens’, ‘Donna and Laura’, and perhaps group terms like ‘team’. Bare plurals in English, such as ‘lions’ in ‘lions have manes’, have generic interpretations, making a nuanced claim about the nature of a kind of animal, the lion. Research across several fields has explored the wide range of interpretations of plural expressions, crosslinguistic differences, use in discourse, as well as different approaches to their formal analysis and implications for theories of cognition.
The workshop will feature presentations of previously circulated papers, comments, and discussion from researchers in the corridor and invited participants from beyond the corridor. This event would be co-sponsored by the Central New York Humanities Corridor, from an award by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Cornell Society for the Humanities, Sage School of Philosophy, Department of Linguistics, and Cognitive Science Program.  

November 8, 2014: Substantial form and causality: Aquinas, Suarez and Descartes (PHI3) Syracuse University
One-day workshop bringing together scholars from Syracuse University and Cornell with interests in both Medieval Aristotelian philosophy and in Descartes, promoting scholarship on Descartes' relationship to his Medieval Aristotelian predecessors, with a focus on accounts of substantial form and causality in the work of Aquinas, Suarez and Descartes.

Guest-speakers:
Simona Vucu of the University of Toronto  on agency and causal power in Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent.
Calvin Normore of UCLA presented his research on matter and quantity in the Scholastics and Descartes. 

November 5, 2014: On Haiku and Machine Learning (DH8) Lecture by Hoyt Long Cornell University

November 4, 2014: Central New York Humanities Corridor Symposium "Papers from the Society for the Study of Biopolitical Futures"(PHI6) Syracuse University

October 31  November 1, 2014: UNYWEMP (PHI3) Conference on German Idealism Cornell University

October 31 – November 1, 2014: Workshop "Religion and Incarceration" (LLC5) Syracuse University

October 31  November 1, 2014: Jewish Studies: In and Out of the Disciplines (LLC17) Conference on Jewish Studies and Anthropology Cornell University

Thursday, October 30, 6:00 p.m., Lewis Auditorium, Goldwin Smith Hall
Joelle Bahloul (Indiana University), “'Tristes Shtetl and Mellah': The Making of Jewish Ethnography in the Structuralist French Academy of the 1970s-1980s"
Friday, October 31, 9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m., 351 Statler Hall
Barbara Johnson (Ithaca College), "Backing Into Anthropology and Jewish Studies by Way of the South Indian Jews" 
Ayala Fader (Fordham), “Saving ‘At Risk’ Ultra-Orthodox Jews : Life Coaches, Torah Therapists and Kirk Rabbis”
Alanna Cooper (Case Western Reserve), “Transnational Judaism:  Religion in Local and Global Perspective” 

October 29, 2014: Visiting Scholar Program (AM2) Brown Bag Presentation Syracuse University
Mary Freeman (Columbia University) on "Letter Writing and Politics in the Campaign Against Slavery."

October 27 – 31, 2014: Francisco Dìaz de Castro on Cante Jondo (flamenco gypsy song) in the Poetry of Federico Garcìa Lorca (LLC13) Syracuse University

October 27, 2014: Intellectual and Cultural Properties in the Global South (DH8) Conference Cornell University

October 25, 2014: "Emergencias" (LLC12) Symposium Cornell University 
Many of us, from our different locations and disciplines, have been thinking about precariousness and emergent practices a good deal lately, focusing on three large and very different realms: social and labor issues in Latin America; the academic workplace and education; and modalities of knowledge exchange (how our work and networks are evolving). Precariousness is often associated with exclusions of class, gender, race, age, and sexual identity and yet, in these times of permanent crisis and emergency, we also see some of the most exciting flowerings of emergent practices. 

These are large questions that have a bearing on many forms of human and social expression. For example, the recent mobilization of millions of citizens in Brazil, the massive student manifestations of the past years in Chile or Puerto Rico, the growing environmental crisis and its effects on local communities across countries and regions, or the plight of 12 million undocumented immigrants in the United States are events that strike to the heart of how we think of democracy in a neoliberal hemispheric context. Broader material, technological, and ecological changes have suggested to us new and unexpected forms of exchange, opening up exciting possibilities for the future. Moreover, new technologies have become central to linguistic, cultural, social, political, and economic subjects as tools to challenge existing exclusions, exercise new horizons of knowledge, and forge creative forms of emergence, visibility, and empowerment. Speakers will include LASA president Debra Castillo (Cornell), past presidents Evelyne Huber (UNC), Jean Franco (Columbia), and Arturo Arias (Texas) as well as vice president-elect  Gilbert Joseph (Yale). 

October 24, 2014: Joe Roach Mini-Seminar (MMH21) Syracuse University. 
Professor Joe Roach (Yale University) 

October 22 – 24 , 2014: Visiting Scholar Program (PHI10) Fall 2014 Humanities, Health and Disabilities Studies Invited Speaker Syracuse University
The Humanities, Health and Disability Studies Working Group will host Critical Disability Studies Scholar Dr. Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, a Professor of Women's Studies and English at Emory University, for a day of SU student and faculty engagement regarding Dr. Garland-Thomson’s scholarship. Dr. Garland-Thomson will arrive in Syracuse Oct. 22, 2014 and depart in the evening of Oct. 23 or morning of Oct. 24, traveling to Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY for a separately-funded event. Dr. Garland-Thomson will present an interactive lecture from her scholarship open to all SU faculty and students, as well as those of other CNY Health and Disability Studies Working Group institutions who wish to travel to the event.

October 17, 2014: Discussion on Aesthetics (PHI8) Syracuse University
On Longinus' on the Sublime.

October 13 – 14 2014:  David Pesetsky (Ferrari P. Ward Professor of Modern Languages and Linguistics; MacVicar Faculty Fellow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Syracuse University  
Technical talks: "Islands in the Modern World" and "Dependent case as Binding Theory".
Public lecture: "Language and Music: Same Structures, Different Building Blocks".   

October 9 &10, 2014: Re-Sounding Appalachian Fiddles (MMH24) Lecture-Demonstrations Syracuse University &Hamilton College
Todd Clewell and the Keystone Rebels will provide a concert with rich notes and background information about the tunes. Todd Clewell has been playing traditional music for more than 35 years. He has spent most of his life in Southcentral Pennsylvania. His Sarah Armstrong fiddle project has sparked the interest of many seeking knowledge of the music of Southwestern Pennsylvania. His research on Sarah Armstrong and the music she played resulted in the issue of his CD “Sarah Armstrong’s Tunes.” He has taught these tunes at the Greenwood Furnace Gathering and Maidencreek Festival. This past year the Derry Area Historical Society awarded him the John Pomeroy award for preserving history. Last year, as a tribute to Sarah Armstrong, the DAHS invited Todd and the “Keystone Rebels” to play at the Railroad Days festival in Derry, PA. Todd plays fiddle, guitar, banjo, mandolin and bass and is a regular on the Contra Dance scene.

October 3, 2014: Seminar with Susan Foster (MMH22) Colgate University. 
Susan Leigh Foster, choreographer and scholar, is Distinguished Professor in the Department of World Arts and Cultures/Dance at UCLA. Professor Foster ail ear a discussion of key chapters from Choreographing Empathy, complemented by several other readings of recent scholarship in dance history. 

October 1, 2014: Workshop and Lecture by Xu Bing (VAC17) Cornell Univeristy

October 1 & 2 , 2014: Fifth Digital Witness Symposium (DH6) Hamilton College & Syracuse University 
The fifth Digital Witness Symposium examines how digital code and computation are reengineering both the ways in which independent media are made and experienced. Sarah Wolozin (Open Doc Lab, MIT) and Patricia Zimmermann (Ithaca College) discuss how contemporary human rights and social justice media are truly thinking through the digital. Patricia Zimmermann is Professor of Screen Studies at Ithaca College and co-director of the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival. She is the author of several books on amateur and documentary film. With co-author Dale Hudson, her forthcoming book is Thinking through Digital Media: Transnational Environments and Locative Places. Sarah Wolozin is Director of the Open Documentary Lab at MIT, which is dedicated to studying emerging documentary forms. Wolozin has produced documentaries and educational media for many media outlets including PBS, Learning Channel, History Channel, NPR, websites and museums.

Wednesday, October 1, 7:00 p.m., 127 Kirner-Johnson Building (KJ), Hamilton College

Thursday, October 2, 7:00 p.m., Watson Theater, Robert B. Menschel Media Center, 316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University

September 19, 2014: Re-Sounding Banjos (MMH24) Lecture-Demonstration Hamilton College
David Deacon will deliver a lecture demonstration that will cover the banjo in early popular and country music. He will focus particularly on clawhammer banjo, but will touch on other styles including thumb lead two finger style, Charlie Poole’s three finger style, and Earl Scruggs’s three finger style. David Deacon is a historian, folklorist, and musician. Raised in the folk music revival in Philadelphia in the 1970s, he has played clawhammer banjo since 1974, and also plays Irish tenor banjo, fiddle, and guitar. As a historian and folklorist, Deacon is particularly interested in the early history of the banjo, and the development of minstrel and related traditional styles of playing. He also explores the development of the banjo as an object, focusing on how banjo players and builders have adapted and tinkered with the instrument since its emergence in the 1830s. Finally, he is interested in how recorded music from the 1920s and 1930s, later recordings of traditional musicians, and published sources informs his and other banjo players’ playing. 

September 11 – 12, 2014: Jewish Studies and the Study of Literature (LLC17) Syracuse University
September 11, 2014 Jewish Studies and the Study of Literature, Keynote speaker Gabriella Safran, with respondent Ken Frieden(Syracuse University). September 12, 2014 Keynote speaker, Gabriella Safran, with special guests Deborah Starr(Cornell), Alice Nakimovsky(Colgate), and Harvey Teres (Syracuse University).

September 9, 2014: Re-Sounding Banjos (MMH24) Lecture-Demonstration Syracuse University
David Deacon will deliver a lecture demonstration that will cover the banjo in early popular and country music. He will focus particularly on clawhammer banjo, but will touch on other styles including thumb lead two finger style, Charlie Poole’s three finger style, and Earl Scruggs’s three finger style. David Deacon is a historian, folklorist, and musician. Raised in the folk music revival in Philadelphia in the 1970s, he has played clawhammer banjo since 1974, and also plays Irish tenor banjo, fiddle, and guitar. As a historian and folklorist, Deacon is particularly interested in the early history of the banjo, and the development of minstrel and related traditional styles of playing. He also explores the development of the banjo as an object, focusing on how banjo players and builders have adapted and tinkered with the instrument since its emergence in the 1830s. Finally, he is interested in how recorded music from the 1920s and 1930s, later recordings of traditional musicians, and published sources informs his and other banjo players’ playing.

September 5, 2014:Visiting Scholar Program (AM2) Brown Bag Presentation Syracuse University
Jenn Thomas (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) on "Researching Nineteenth-Century Insane Asylum Landscapes of New York State."

August 29, 2014: Visiting Scholar Program (AM2) Brown Bag Presentation Syracuse University
Richard Bell (University of Maryland) on "The Blackest Market: Kidnapping, Slavery and Salvation."

 

Summer


June 6  9, 2014: SPAWN (PHI1) 2014 Conference, Syracuse University
SPAWN is Syracuse Philosophy Department’s annual summer conference. The topic for 2014 is Philosophy Of Disability. The conference features philosophers and disability scholars from the U.S. and Europe. 

 

Winter/Spring


April 11 – 12, 2014: Late Antiquity (PHI8) "Senses, Affect, and the Imagination in Late Antiquity," Symposium, Colgate University

Keynote from Carlin Barton (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

April 11 – 12 2014: Digital Humanities Working Group (DH6) THATCamp CNY 2014, Syracuse University


April 4, 2014: Performance/History (MMH22) Seminar with Daphne Brooks, Colgate University
Professor Daphne Brooks (Colgate University) on broad, methodological issues in performance history, and her current book project Subterranean Blues: Black Women and Sound Subculture.

April 3, 2014: Visiting Scholar Program (AM2) Brown Bag Presentation Syracuse University
Lawrence Chua (Hamilton College) on "Architecture, Hip Hop, and Utopia."



March 27, 2014: Re-Sounding History (MMH24), Re-Sounding Klezmer Lecture-Demonstration, Colgate University 
Lecture-demonstration by Peter Rushefsky (Center for Traditional Music and Dance).

March 27, 2014: Re-Sounding History (MMH24), Re-Sounding Klezmer Lecture-Demonstration, Syracuse University 
Lecture-demonstration by Peter Rushefsky (Center for Traditional Music and Dance).

March 21, 2014: Language, Identity, and Power (LLC1) Modernizing India, Syracuse University
Workshop and talk with Kira Hall (University of Colorado, Boulder).

March 6 – 7 2014: Jewish Studies Working Group (LLC17) Jewish Studies and the Disciplines Spring Workshop, University of Rochester
A keynote address by Professor Randall Styers (UNC-Chapel Hill), and a roundtable discussion of the intersection of Jewish Studies and the academic study of religion.

February 28, 2014: Re-Sounding History (MMH24), Zeke Leonard, Hamilton College
Lecture-demonstration by Professor Leonard (Syracuse University) of his found-object instruments.

February 28, 2014: Critical Theory and the Global – The Politics of Translation (LLC9) Workshop/Seminar, Cornell University
Workshop/seminar with Samuel Weber (Avalon Professor of Humanities at Northwestern University).

February 21, 2014: Mobilizing Music – Gender and Performativity (MMH21) Kiri Miller Mini-Seminar, Syracuse University 
Professor Kiri Miller (Brown University) on issues of gender and virtual musical performance in new digital medias.

February 20, 2014: Re-Sounding History (MMH24), Zeke Leonard, Syracuse University 
Lecture-demonstration by Professor Leonard (Syracuse University) of his found-object instruments.

February 7, 2014: Visiting Scholar Program (AM2) Brown Bag Presentation Syracuse University
Jeanelle Hope (Syracuse University) on "Seeking Poetic Justice: Positioning Black Women and Queer Identifying into the Black Power Historical Narrative."



January 10, 2014: Visiting Scholar Program (AM2) Brown Bag Presentation Syracuse University
Philip Lockley presenting on "Millennialism, Communalism and the Origins of Socialism: Transatlantic Theologies of Transformation before 1848."