2015 Events Calendar

Fall

November 23, 2015: Digital Humanities Speaker Series (DH8) Sharon Daniel (UC, Santa Cruz) 4:30 p.m. Guerlac Room, A.D. White House, Cornell University

Contact: Mary Ahl

November 14  15, 2015: Syntax-Semantics Interface (LIN4) Relative Clause Workshop
PSB 401, Cornell University 
This workshop will bring specialists from the region, Canada, and Japan to discuss the topic of prehead relative clauses: relative clauses that precede the noun they modify. This syntactic pattern is found widely across the languages of the world, but in most of the languages of East Asia it is the only pattern. Relative clauses of this type have long raised  questions from the standpoint of natural language processing as well as syntactic theory. Participants will include specialists in computational and experimental linguistics as well as syntax.  Invited speakers for the workshop will include C.-T. James Huang (Harvard University), Chung-hye Han (Simon Fraser University), Anna Bugaeva (National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics), and Iku Nagasaki (National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics).

Contact: Michael Williamson

October 24, 2015: Nineteenth Century Studies (LLC6) Victorian Interventions
While taking as their objects very different aspects of Victorian culture, recent books by Professors Supritha Rajan and Elisha Cohn both make important interventions into the field of Victorian Studies by bringing together discourses long thought antithetical to one another and showing how a submerged discourse or impulse actually plays a constitutive role in a field where it has seemed alien, if not anathema.  Professor Rajan examines the discourses of the sacred that are threaded through the emergent nineteenth-century discourses of political economy, while Professor Cohn examines “lyric” moments—moments of suspended consciousness—that trouble the teleological bildung of the Victorian novel. Registration required.
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., 307 Tolley Humanities Building, Syracuse University 

Contact: Claudia Klaver

October 9  11, 2015: Mobilizing Music (MMH21) Artist Residency Women in Mbira Performance: Patience Chaitezvi 
Zimbabwean musician Patience Chaitezvi, one of the world's few female mbira masters, will be visiting the University of Rochester on a brief artist residency. Activities will include a lecture/demo, facilitated by Assistant Professor Jennifer W. Kyker, on Patience's experiences performing at the Dzivaguru cult center on the afternoon of Friday, October 9th, followed by an evening concert with members of the Eastman mbira ensemble. Patience will also teach Instructor Glenn West's beginning mbira class on the morning of Saturday, October 10th and Dr. Kyker's intermediate mbira class on Sunday, October 11th. All events are open to participants from the Central New York Humanities Corridor as well as the general public. 

TBD, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

Contact: Jennifer Kyker

September 22, 2015: The Chinese Quest for Modernity from the Religious Perspective (LLC2) Disjunctions, Substitutions, and Artifice: Divinities, Ritual, and Ritual Theory in Classical China Michael Puett, Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History East Asian Languages and Civilizations (Harvard University) 
5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, Room 442, University of Rochester

Contact: Shin-yi Chao

September 16, 2015: Global Biennale (VAC17) Lecture Humanities and Plastic Surgery: The Logic of Human Capital in South Korea Alex Taek-Gwang Lee (Kyung Hee University)  
4:30 p.m. Guerlac Room, A.D. White House, Cornell University

September 15, 2015: Global Biennale (VAC17) Workshop Perspectives on the Humanities & Arts in South Korea with Timothy Murray, Director, Society for the Humanities (Cornell), Youngmin Kim (Dongguk University), and Alex Taek-Gwang Lee (Kyung Hee University)
4:30 p.m. Room 110, A.D. White House 120, Cornell University

September 14, 2015: Global Biennale (VAC17) Lecture Traveling Poetry, Traveling Theory, and the Humanities Youngmin Kim (Dongguk University)
4:30 p.m. Guerlac Room, A.D. White House, Cornell University

Contact: Mary Ahl


Winter/Spring

April 24, 2015: Re-Sounding History (MMH24) Lecture-Demonstration Re-Sounding South India

Re-Sounding South India celebrates the rich historical traditions that inform the lineage of Karnatak music. Performers Balu and David have worked extensively with now historical recordings made by their principal teachers T. Brinda and T. Viswanathan (Balu) and T. Ranganathan (David). At a recent Navaratri concert at Wesleyan they featured a performance of a ragam-tanam-pallavi first performed at Wesleyan by Viswanathan and Ranganathan in 1972. Their performances are deeply influenced by their teachers’ example as artist and teachers.
12:00 p.m. – 1 p.m. Schambach 120, Hamilton College

April 23, 2015: Re-Sounding History (MMH24) Lecture-Demonstration Re-Sounding South India
Re-Sounding South India celebrates the rich historical traditions that inform the lineage of Karnatak music. Performers Balu and David have worked extensively with now historical recordings made by their principal teachers T. Brinda and T. Viswanathan (Balu) and T. Ranganathan (David). At a recent Navaratri concert at Wesleyan they featured a performance of a ragam-tanam-pallavi first performed at Wesleyan by Viswanathan and Ranganathan in 1972. Their performances are deeply influenced by their teachers’ example as artist and teachers.
7:00 p.m. – 9 p.m. Maxwell Auditorium, Syracuse University

April 17, 2015: Facismo (LLC15) International Conference Making, Thinking, and Imagining History
The conference brings an interdisciplinary debate on one of the most intriguing, momentous, culturally exuberant, and highly controversial periods of Italian history. The speakers will examine major aspects of Italian Fascism from a multiplicity of perspectives including history, literature, cultural and intellectual history, political philosophy, architecture, visual-cultural studies, and film. University of Rochester faculty will contribute to the debate as session chairs and respondents.
9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Welles Brown Room, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester

April 17, 2015: The Chinese Quest for Modernity from the Religious Perspective (LLC2) Spring Workshop
Thomas A. Wilson (Elizabeth McCormack Professor of History, Hamilton College) on 'Conceptions of Heaven and God in the Imperial Cults of China'.
3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library Room 442, University of Rochester

March 7 2015: Biopolitics (PHI6) Workshop New Directions 
Biopolitics as a contemporary object of study and an analytic framework has proliferated in multiple discursive fields in the humanities and social sciences. This proliferation far outweighs the initial articulation of the concept in Michel Foucault’s 1970s lectures. Thus, Biopolitics is often used in contradictory ways to refer to questions as heterogeneous as the war on terror, the female reproductive body, neoliberalism, the human genome project, and the prison industrial complex. With the publication in 2011 of Francois Debrix and Alexander Barder's Beyond Biopolitics: Theory, Violence, and Horror in World Politics and Patricia Ticineto Clough and Craig Willse’s Beyond Biopolitics: Essays on the Governance of Life and Death, some consider the concept to have been exhausted in earlier accounts, theses, and provocations. Taking seriously these moments of joy or anxiety, and building on Gregg Lambert’s initiative “the Society for the Study of Biopolitical Futures,” this workshop seeks to show the richness of investigations still available on Biopolitics. The assigned readings demonstrate, along with Cary Wolfe's Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame (2012) and Kevin Attell’s Giorgio Agamben: Beyond the Threshold of Deconstruction (2014), to name only a few, the new directions that  conversations on Biopolitics can take. We seek to participate in charting the future directions of the concept in ways that our colleagues and students across the university working closely or remotely on biopolitics can find thought-provoking. 
9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., AD White House, Cornell University

March 6, 2015: Re-Sounding History (MMH24) Lecture-Demonstration Re-Sounding Macedonia Odglasi's musicians have been playing and researching traditional Macedonian music for many years, working in the field, the archives, and with master musicians and orchestras in both Macedonia and the diaspora. Class, ethnicity, gender and politics shaped the development of distinct musical genres in Macedonian communities inside and outside of the present political borders, and Odglasi excels at presenting the unique phrasing, rhythm and energy of these different repertoires. Every band member brings a different research/musicianship perspective to their performance, and to their lecture/workshop/performance work.
12:15 p.m. Clarke Room, JC Colgate Hall, Colgate University

March 6, 2015: Critical Theory and the Global (LLC9) Multi-Media Workshop Still Hear the Wound: Art, Affect, and Post-Colonial Memory in Japan
9:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., 374 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University

March 5, 2015: Re-Sounding History (MMH24) Lecture-Demonstration Re-Sounding Macedonia
Odglasi's musicians have been playing and researching traditional Macedonian music for many years, working in the field, the archives, and with master musicians and orchestras in both Macedonia and the diaspora. Class, ethnicity, gender and politics shaped the development of distinct musical genres in Macedonian communities inside and outside of the present political borders, and Odglasi excels at presenting the unique phrasing, rhythm and energy of these different repertoires. Every band member brings a different research/musicianship perspective to their performance, and to their lecture/workshop/performance work.
8:00 p.m. 111 Bowne Hall Syracuse University

February 10, 2015: Re-Sounding History (MMH24) Re-Sounding Gospel
African American music historian, composer, author, and board member of the Gospel Workshop of America, Dr. Joan Hillsman will draw on her vast experience to demonstrate how gospel’s historical roots inform its practice today.
The event, open to the public, will take place in conjunction with Dr. Sydney Hutchinson's class, "Musics of Multicultural America." Hendricks Chapel has agreed to support the event as well, as has the Community Folkarts Center.
11:00 a.m. 104 Bowne Hall, Syracuse University