2016 Events Calendar

CNY HUMANITIES CORRIDOR: 2016 EVENTS CALENDAR

 

Fall

November 18, 2016: Performance/History (MMH22), Remembering the Dérive: Attunement, Mimesis, and Performance in the City, 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Little Hall 201, Colgate University
Professor Elin Diamond (Rutgers University) is best known for her book, Unmaking Mimesis: Essays on Feminism and Theater, and her edited volume, Performance and Cultural Politics. She's also the author of Pinter's Comic Play and numerous articles that explore theater and performance through the lens of feminist and critical theory. Her seminar will be followed by a casual dinner. Professor Diamond will share a few texts for attendees to read in preparation.

To RSVP, please contact Mary Simonson msimonson(at)colgate.edu.

November 11, 2016: Early Modern Spanish (LLC18), Literature, Politics and the Public Sphere in the Early Modern Mediterranean, 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Kilian Room (500 HL), Syracuse University
This workshop brings together scholars from the Central New York area and other nearby regions in order to discuss topics related to the relationship between Spain and the Mediterranean in the Early Modern period. Presentations will focus on a variety of Spanish literary and historical texts, as well as key individuals and events, that illustrate the complex cultural and political reality of the Mediterranean world, and how the different peoples of the region interacted with the dynamics of the Spanish Habsburgs empire. Presentations will be in Spanish and English.

For more information contact Alejandro Garcia-Reidy agarci07(at)syr.edu

November 11, 2016: Jewish Studies (LLC17), Technologies of Memory, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Barnes Hall, Cornell University
Talk/presentation on memory and post-memory by Marianne Hirsch (Columbia) and Leo Spitzer (Dartmouth).

October 27, 2016: The Chinese Quest for Modernity from the Religious Perspective (LLC2), Islamic Shangri-La: Tibetan Muslims and the Emergence of Modern Tibet, 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, Room 442, University of Rochester
Professor David Atwill (Penn State) will explore the roots of Tibetan Muslims in Tibet as well as offer an overview of their central role in the diplomatic tensions between India and China in 1960.

October 20, 2016: Urban Video Project's Screening + Q&A with Apichatpong Weekasethakul (VAC8): Cemetery of Splendor 6:30 – 9:00 p.m. Everyone Museum of Art, Hosmer Auditorium, 401 Harrison Street, Syracuse 
Fresh from the Cannes Film Festival, experience the latest feature-length film by celebrated Thai filmmaker, Apichatpong Weerasethakul at this screening of Cemetery of Splendor. The filmmaker conducts a live-stream Q&A following the screening. Attendees are invited to stay for a reception.

The screening of Cemetery of Splendor and Q&A with the filmmaker is made possible through the generous support of CNY Humanities Corridor and the Syracuse University Visiting Artist Lecture Series. This event is part of the official program of the 2016 Syracuse International Film Festival

October 18, 2016: Critical Asian Cinematic Spaces (VAC2), Is Art Lighthearted? 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. 325 Slocum Hall, Syracuse University
Led by Una Chung, PhD, Assistant Professor of Modern and Classical Literatures, Sarah Lawrence College) this seminar on Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cemetery of Splendor (2015) explores unusual film semiotics of Cemetery of Splendor, which not only puts into play compositional elements of visual representation but also directly incorporates thresholds of wakefulness and rhythms of awareness to produce an immersive cinema. The group investigates the aesthetics of lightness and the affective register of humor in this film for what they tell us about the changing conditions of knowledge and experience of art today.

Participants should RSVP to Lawrence Chua lachua(at)syr.edu for copies of the readings.

October 13, 2016: Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery (LLC11), Fall Lecture and Workshop on Language, Culture, and Writing, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Falk 275, Syracuse University
Algerian/Italian author Amara Lakhous speaks about his relationship with language and culture as evidenced in his award winning fiction.

September 16, 2016: The Chinese Quest for Modernity from the Religious Perspective (LLC2), The Book of Changes: From Confucian Classic to Counterculture Icon, 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, Room 456, University of Rochester
Professor Hon Tze-ki (SUNY Geneso) will discuss how I Ching (The Book of Change), a canonized Confucian classic, was translated into German and English, and eventually became a popular text in the counter-culture movement in the United States in the 1950s. For more information, contact Elya Zhang.

September 15, 2016: Jewish Studies (LLC17), Technologies of Memory, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Barnes Hall, Cornell University
Composers Julia Wolfe (2015 Pulitzer Prize) and Michael Gordon, co-founders of the renowned NYC-based group, Bang on a Can, team up for a concert of their works that focuses on spirituality and music. Features music for choir, string quartet, amplified rock ensemble, and the premiere of Wolfe’s duo for cello and double bass by John Haines-Eitzen and guest bassist Tomoya Aomori. For information, contact jewishstudies(at)cornell.edu.

This series is intended to highlight and introduce to the Central New York academic and general community the advent of access, through the Cornell Library, to the USC Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive. This archive contains over 53,000 individual testimonies covering the Nazi genocide, the Armenian genocide, the Rwandan genocide, and the Nanjing massacre. It will be fully available to anyone in the region, whether affiliated with an institution of higher education, a high school teacher, or a member of the general public.

 


Winter/Spring

May 18 – 20, 2016: International Association for the Philosophy of Death and Dying Conference (PHI1), 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. 102, 107, 114 & 500 Hall of Languages, Syracuse University
The International Association for the Philosophy of Death & Dying's second conference.
Keynote speakers: Frances Kamm (Harvard) and Shelly Kagan (Yale).

April 21, 2016: Alguien al otro lado (LLC13), Fernando Léon de Aranoa, Spanish Film Today, 12:30 – 1:50 p.m. Hall of Languages (214), Syracuse University
Fernando León de Aranoa will discuss his career as a filmmaker and a documentarian. León de Aranoa was born in 1968 in Madrid, Spain. He is an accomplished writer and director, well known for films such as Barrio, Princesas, and Los lunes al sol, which starred Javier Bardem and won five prizes at the Goya Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. The film was also selected to represent Spain at the Oscars in the category of Best Foreign Language Film. His latest movie, A Perfect Day, which features the American actors Benicio del Toro and Tim Robins, won the best adapted screenplay Goya award this year.

Co-Sponsors:
Le Moyne’s Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Department of Communication and Film Studies, Department of Political Science, Spanish Club and Lectures Committee; Syracuse University.

April 17, 2016: Critical Cinematic Asian Spaces (VAC2), Workshop on Taking of Tiger Mountain 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Spencer House Great Room, Hamilton College
The workshop will screen The Taking of Tiger Mountain (2014), renowned Hong Kong director Tsui Hark's mega-action remake of the Cultural Revolution model play film Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy (1970), as well as discuss four selected readings related to the two films.

April 15, 2016: Mobilizing Music – Social Justice (MMH21), Taking Sides: Music, Research, and Activism in India 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 341 Eggers, Syracuse University
Mini-seminar featuring Dr. Zoe Sherinian (University of Oklahoma) and Dr. Carol Babiracki (Syracuse University) in a dialogue about field research in marginal music communities in India and activist ethnomusicology. Followed by a screening of Sherinian’s latest documentary on Parai Drummers in Tamil Nadui.

April 14, 2016: Critical Cinematic Asian Spaces (VAC2), Robin Visser (University of North Carolina) The Chinese Eco-City and Urbanization Planning 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. 201 Slocum, Syracuse University
In her lecture, Visser will analyze three case studies of Chinese “eco-city” development within the context of national “urbanization planning” policies in order to elucidate prevalent rural land conversion mechanisms within China’s rapidly evolving urbanization strategies. Urban-rural integration policies aim to develop vast regions as metropolitan networks, industrialize agriculture, and relocate thousands of farmers into new or redeveloped cities.She explores how the rhetoric of sustainability rationalizes land transfers in order to evaluate whether eco-city projects function primarily within a virtual speculative economy rather than significantly contributing to the social or ecological good.

Co-Sponsor:
The School of Architecture

Contact: Lawrence Chua

April 13, 2016: Critical Cinematic Asian Spaces (VAC2), Robin Visser (University of North Carolina) The Chinese Eco-City and Urbanization Planning 5:00 – 7:30 p.m. Slocum Library, Syracuse University
Robin Visser (B.S. Engineering, University of Michigan; Ph.D. Chinese, Columbia University) is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Asian Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She specializes in Chinese literature, urban studies, and environmental studies. Her first book, Cities Surround the Countryside: Urban Aesthetics in Postsocialist China (Duke UP, 2010), analyzes Chinese urban planning, architecture, fiction, cinema, art and cultural studies at the turn of the twentyfirst century. She has published numerous articles and translations on Chinese and Taiwanese urban cultural studies, literature, and cinema, and has forthcoming essays on Chinese eco-city planning and global creative city policies. She is Chief Co-editor of the Chinese-language Journal of East Asian Humanities《東亞人文》, serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, and is a Standing Review Board Member of the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong SAR. Her current research is for a book manuscript on Sinophone environmental literature, tentatively titled Bordering Chinese Eco-Literatures.

Co-Sponsor:
The American Institute of Architects Student Group at SU

Contact: Lawrence Chua

April 9 – 10, 2016: Digital Humanities Initiative (DH2), Chris Foster (Syracuse University), Tom McEnaney (Cornell University), THATCamp 1:00 – 5:30 p.m. Olin Library, Cornell University
The graduate student symposium will last one half day and lead directly into a 1.5 day THATCamp, to be hosted at Cornell University and open to public participation. The THATCamp will build on the model of the CNY THATCamp held at Syracuse University in 2014; we will propose sessions on topics such as: specific tools and methods for digital scholarship (data visualization, text analysis, etc.); new forms and formats for digital publishing; digital pedagogy; innovative work with digital media collections; lightning talks on participants’ projects.

Contact: Mia Tootill

April 9, 2016: LELACS/Global Literatures and Cultures (LLC12), LELACS Program 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Bird Library 114, Peter Graham Scholarly Commons Room, Syracuse University
This event will feature two invited speakers plus paper presentations from regional scholars. In addition to these more formal presentations, there will be time for discussion and informal conversation among regional scholars and graduate students on the topic of transnational studies as related to Latin America.

Contact: Gail Bulman

April 9, 2016: Digital Humanities Initiative (DH2), Chris Foster (Syracuse University), Tom McEnaney (Cornell University), Graduate Student Symposium 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Olin Library, Cornell University
The first half of the symposium will consist of short lightening presentations where a selection of students will present their work. The symposium will also include a session where participants can workshop papers on their digital humanities projects. This session will help to address some of the challenges and uncertainties that graduate students often face when attempting to publish written work about their digital projects: for example, the need to write for often radically interdisciplinary audiences, or the relative scarceness of models. This event will help to establish a collaborative conversation between graduate students from different institutions in the CNY Humanities corridor.

Contact: Mia Tootill

April 1, 2016: LELACS/Global Literatures and Cultures (LLC12), Re-Envisioning Japan through Digital Humanities: Twentieth-Century Japan in Objects, Images, and Personal Exchange 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. Kittredge Auditorium, Syracuse University
Collections in archives, museums, or libraries excite us with promise of discovery and new beginnings. Open-access online collections do this with unprecednented immediacy. Re-Envisioning Japan: Japan as Destination in 20th Century Visual and Material Culture is an online archive of tourism, travel, and educational ephemera that documents changing representations of Japan and its place in the world to mid 20th century. It exemplifies digital scholarship's capacity to help us see things differently. Through the creative curation of material objects in digital space, objects can resonate with historical "voice," suggesting historical narratives beyond those embedded in words.

Contact: Gail Bulman

March 18, 2016: Lecture on Digital Humanities, Anne-Marie Duguet (University of Paris 1) Anarchive New Media Project 9:30 a.m.  4:00 p.m. Kroch Library 2B, Cornell University
Featured public presentation by Anne-Marie Duguet (University of Paris 1) on New Media Archiving for day long workshop on the Cornell Special Collections exhibition “Signal to Code: 50 Years of Media in the Rose Goldsen Archive.”

March 11, 2016: Mellon Distinguished Visiting Collaborator (MC1), Cary Wolfe (Rice University) After Biopolitics 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 304 Tolley, Syracuse University
Professor Wolfe lectures and publishes widely in the areas of animal studies and post-humanism, systems theory and pragmatism, biopolitics and biophilosophy, American literature and culture.

*Advance registration required to Mi Ditmar [mmditmar(at)syr.edu or 315-443-5944] by March 7, 2016. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Co-Sponsor:
Syracuse University Humanities Center

March 10, 2016: Mellon Distinguished Visiting Collaborator (MC1), Cary Wolfe (Rice University) and Artist Maria Whiteman (University of Alberta) Between Species 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Everson Museum of Art Hosmer Auditorium, 401 Harrison Street, Syracuse, NY
The CNY Humanities Corridor is pleased to welcome Cary Wolfe, the Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor of English and Director of 3CT: Center for Critical and Cultural Theory at Rice University, as the 2016 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Collaborator. Wolfe's talk explores the thickly textured nature of "extinction," how art, science, and philosophy respond to the challenge of thinking extinction and our ethical responsibilities to other forms of life.

Contact: Anneka Herre

Co-Sponsor:
Urban Video Project

March 9, 2016: Mellon Distinguished Visiting Collaborator (MC1), Cary Wolfe (Rice University) The Poetics of Extinction 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 123 Sims, Syracuse University
The CNY Humanities Corridor is pleased to welcome Cary Wolfe, the Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor of English and Director of 3CT: Center for Critical and Cultural Theory at Rice University, as the 2016 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Collaborator. Wolfe's talk explores the thickly textured nature of "extinction," how art, science, and philosophy respond to the challenge of thinking extinction and our ethical responsibilities to other forms of life.

Co-Sponsors:
The Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies in the College of Visual and Performing Arts
Syracuse University Humanities Center

March 3, 2016: Digital Humanities Speaker Series (DH8), Jentery Sayers (University of Victoria) Making Things, Writing Things: Prototyping as a Compositional Strategy, 2:15 – 3:45 p.m. Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages, Syracuse University
Sayers examines the affordances of fabrication for scholarly communication, with particular attention to rapid prototyping, or the iterative production of abstract models in tactile form.

Co-Sponsors:
Syracuse University Writing Program
Syracuse University Libraries
Syracuse University Writing Program Student Organization
Syracuse University English Department
Syracuse University Composition and Culture Rhetoric Grad Circle

Digital Humanities Working Group at Syracuse University

Contact: Patrick Berry

March 1, 2016: Digital Humanities Speaker Series (DH8), Jentery Sayers (University of Victoria) Prototyping Absence, Remaking Old Media, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. Guerlac Room, A.D. White House, Cornell University
When conducting archival research, historians of media and technology frequently encounter devices that no longer work or existed only as illustrations, fictions, or one-offs. Rather than studying such uncertainty at remove, this talk outlines ways to prototype absences in the historical record. It draws from examples of remaking old media to demonstrate how prototyping the past affords unique approaches to examining the contingent relations between matter and meaning, without fetishizing exact reproductions of historical artifacts.

More information

February 26, 2016: New Media Art Practice (VAC4), Digital Mapping Performance, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. The Vis Lab, Ho Science Center, Colgate University
Digital Aesthetic Digital Mapping Performance

Hosted by Colgate University’s Film & Media Studies and Art & Art History

Contact: Angela Kowalski

February 26, 2016: New Media Art Practice (VAC4), Digital Aesthetic Symposium, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Golden Auditorium, Little Hall, Colgate University
Topics: digital glitch art, digital fabrication, digital visualization and digital mapping.

Panel and Artist talks by artist Evan Meaney (University of South Carolina), Rebecca Ruige Xu (Syracuse University), Chi KA (NYU - ITP), and Fernando Orellana (Union College).

Hosted by Colgate University’s Film & Media Studies and Art & Art History

Contact: Angela Kowalski

February 23, 2016: New Media Art Practice (VAC4), Early Computer Animation Screening, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. Golden Auditorium, Little Hall, Colgate University
Rebecca Xu of Syracuse University will introduce the screening on the early computer animation pioneers and history, such as Mary Ellen Bute, John Stehura, Stan VanDerBeek, Lillian Schwartz, Ed Emshwiller, Ron Hays, Lynn Goldsmith.

Hosted by Colgate University’s Film & Media Studies and Art & Art History

Contact: Angela Kowalski